So, if you have an issue where you need to forward a port to a different location with Windows, you’re in luck. Whilst you don’t have xinetd, you don’t have to use a third party tool or service.

SYSTEM A – 10.0.0.10

SYSTEM B – 192.168.0.10

SYSTEM C – 172.16.0.10

If you cannot directly route SYSTEM A to SYSTEM C but need to hit a service running on port 25/tcp on SYSTEM C from SYSTEM A, you can use portproxy. Let’s say both sides can hit SYSTEM B. You can use portproxy to set up SYSTEM B to forward your request to SYSTEM C, yet access the same service from SYSTEM A by hitting SYSTEM B.

Simply at the command prompt on SYSTEM B, type:

netsh

interface portproxy

add v4tov4 listenport=25 connectaddress=172.16.0.10 connectport=25 protocol=tcp

This means when you now hit 192.168.0.10 on port 25, you’ll receive the data from SYSTEM C’s socket. Simple port proxying or forwarding.

You can also do this from IPv4 to v6, or v6 to v6.
Best of all, you can use DNS names.. !!

Simply add this in as a startup script via a group policy object, and you’ve got your own cross-network router for specific ports.

Port Proxy documentation at Microsoft:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc776297%28WS.10%29.aspx

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